The Latest: Nobel winner Rosbash praises the fruit fly


The Latest on the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (all times local):

2:20 p.m.

Nobel Medicine winner Michael Rosbash says, at 73, it’s usually never good to get a call at 5:09 a.m. on your landline.

He told The Associated Press on Monday that “when the landline rings at that hour, normally it’s because someone died.”

Then, on finding out that he had won a Nobel Prize: “I was stunned, shocked.”

Rosbash and fellow Americans Jeffrey C. Hall and Michael W. Young won for their discoveries about the body’s daily rhythms, opening up whole new fields of research and raising awareness about the importance of getting a good night’s sleep.

Rosbash says he started on this work in 1982. He says “I am very pleased. I am very pleased for the field. I am very pleased for the fruit fly. And it is a great thing for the university. I stand on the shoulders of giants. This is a very humbling award.”

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10:30 p.m.

Michael Hastings, a scientist at the U.K. Medical Research Council, said the discoveries by the 2017 Nobel Medicine winners had opened up a whole new field of study for biology and medicine.

“Until then, the body clock was viewed as a sort of black box,” Hastings told The Associated Press. “We knew nothing about its operation. But what they did was get the genes that made the body clock, and once you’ve got the genes, you can take the field wherever you want to.”

“It’s a field that has exploded massively, propelled by the discoveries by these guys,” he told the AP.

Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young won 9-million-kronor ($1.1 million) prize. Their work stems back to 1984, when Rosbash and Hall, who was then also at Brandeis University, along with Young isolated the “period gene” in fruit flies. Hall and Rosbash found that a protein encoded by the gene accumulated during the night and degraded during daytime. A decade later, Young discovered another “clock gene.”

“The paradigm-shifting discoveries by the laureates established key mechanisms for the biological clock,” the Nobel Assembly said.

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10:30 p.m.

Three Americans won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday for their discoveries about the body’s daily rhythms, opening up whole new fields of research and raising awareness about the importance of getting proper sleep.

Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young won 9-million-kronor ($1.1 million) prize for isolating a gene that controls the body’s normal daily biological rhythm. Circadian rhythms adapt the workings of the body…



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